Fukushima release to ocean may be three times what TEPCO estimated

As the Fukushima nuclear disaster is supplanted by other media stories, it is crucially important to continue to monitor what coverage there still is. Case in point, a Reuters article from this morning:

Radioactive material released into the sea in the Fukushima nuclear power plant crisis is more than triple the amount estimated by plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co, Japanese researchers say.

Japan’s biggest utility estimated around 4,720 trillion becquerels of cesium-137 and iodine-131 was released into the Pacific Ocean between March 21 and April 30, but researchers at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) put the amount 15,000 trillion becquerels, or terabecquerels.

The report says that TEPCO did not estimate airborne materials that fell into the ocean:

Takuya Kobayashi, a researcher at the agency, said on Friday the difference in figures was probably because his team measured airborne radioactive material that fell into the ocean in addition to material from contaminated water that leaked from the plant.

He believed Tepco excluded radiation that originally came from airborne material.

And, the actual situation may be worse than the new report estimates:

The report does not include cesium-134 as the research group initially lacked resources to measure it, meaning the amount of estimated radioactive material will increase with further calculations.

Link: http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/09/09/us-japan-tepco-idUSTRE7882E720110909

 

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About Robert Singleton

By day, I work for a call center. In my spare time, I try to save my hometown (and planet) from a nearly constant onslaught of greedheads, lunatics and land developers. I live in a fictional town called Austin, Texas, where I go to way too many meetings.
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