Voice of America has more details on worker exposure

The Voice of America reported today:

Two workers at the Fukushima-1 nuclear power plant have been hospitalized for radiation exposure suffered on Thursday.

They are among those frantically trying to get critical cooling functions restored to damaged reactors and fuel ponds.

Although the first paragraphs identifies the workers as having been irradiated at Fukushima-1, further in the article, they are identified as working at Unit 3. (The confusion probably results from the fact that the six reactors are collectively known as Fukushima Daiichi, or Fukushima-1 in English, as opposed to the four reactors at Fukushima Daini, or Fukushima-2):

The hospitalized workers were exposed to excessive radiation exposure following an accident Thursday.

Japan’s chief cabinet secretary Yukio Edano told reporters that two of three men working together in the damaged Number 3 reactor’s turbine building slipped into water and did not realize they had been exposed to high levels of radiation until they noticed a rash on their skin.

The two are said to be suffering from beta ray burns.

Tokyo Electric Power Company Vice President Sakae Muto says the men were underground laying cable critical to restarting the cooling system for the reactor, which contains a mix of plutonium and uranium fuel.

All three workers were exposed to between 170 and 180 milliseverts of radiation, said Muto. That is less than the maximum of 250 millisieverts for workers at the plant that has been set by the government. About 25 people injured at the nuclear plant since it began leaking radiation following damage on March 11 from the quake-triggered tsunami.

There is more troubling information in the Voice of America piece:

There is also fresh concern about the damaged Number 1 reactor, where pressure inside the reactor again increased. Crews are trying to maintain a delicate balance between spraying water on the radioactive fuel, which causes a rise in pressure, and reducing the water flow which could see temperatures increase to a dangerously high level.

Here’s the link: http://www.voanews.com/english/news/asia/east-pacific/Repair-Work-Resumes-at-Crippled-Japanese-Nuclear-Plant-118563704.html

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About Robert Singleton

By day, I work for a call center. In my spare time, I try to save my hometown (and planet) from a nearly constant onslaught of greedheads, lunatics and land developers. I live in a fictional town called Austin, Texas, where I go to way too many meetings.
This entry was posted in Japan, Radiation leak, Reactor problems. Bookmark the permalink.

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