New report: U.S. ‘nuclear renaissance’ unlikely after Fukushima

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(Is it just me, or is there something about this picture of one of the containment buildings at Fukushima that’s just a little reminiscent of Norman Bates’ mother’s house in Psycho?)

The Los Angeles Times just reported:

A new study released Wednesday said that the regulatory fallout from the Fukushima power plant disaster in Japan in March will short-circuit the U.S. nuclear renaissance of new power plant construction.

The report, “Nuclear Safety and Nuclear Economics,” was written and presented by Mark Cooper, a frequent critic of the nuclear power industry.

Cooper is a senior fellow for economic analysis at the Institute for Energy and the Environment at the Vermont Law School.

Cooper said that past nuclear disasters, such as the one at the Three Mile Island power plant in Pennsylvania in 1979, have tended to greatly raise regulatory barriers and have also severely multiplied the cost of reactor construction. After Three Mile Island, for example, the report said, the cost of nuclear power plant construction doubled in most cases and trebled or quadrupled in some rare instances.

According to Cooper:

“This is an important moment to compare what is really likely to happen over the next 10 years with the industry’s expectations” of a nuclear renaissance, Cooper said. “When that comparison is performed properly, it becomes clear that we are witnessing not a revival but a collapse in expectations for new reactor construction.”

The Los Angeles Times also reported:

A recently updated online report by the World Nuclear Assn. said that as few as four of the 26 new nuclear facilities that have been proposed or planned in the U.S. will be finished by 2020. But it did not mention Fukushima and instead said the primary reason was the fact that a boom in domestic natural gas production has “put the economic viability of some of these projects in doubt.”

Here’s a link to the L.A. Times article: http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/money_co/2011/12/a-new-study-released-today-said-that-theregulatory-fallout-from-the-fukushima-power-plantdisaster-in-japan-last-marchwill-pro.html

And here’s a link to Mark Cooper’s report: http://www.markcooperresearch.com/Nuclear-Safety-and-Nuclear-Economics-Post-Fukushima.pdf

 

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About Robert Singleton

By day, I work for a temp staffing agency. In my spare time, I try to save my hometown (and planet) from a nearly constant onslaught of greedheads, lunatics and land developers. I live in a fictional town called Austin, Texas, where I go to way too many meetings.
This entry was posted in Construction delays, Expansion, Finance, Fukushima, GE Mark I reactor, Nuclear Renaissance and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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